how to make handmade noodle soup -kalguksu-칼국수

how to make handmade noodle soup -kalguksu-칼국수

Another exciting class at Korean Tourism in Singapore last Friday! I was very ambitious and decided to prepare some dough for my students to hand cut noodles. We are making kal-guk-su(칼국수 – handmade noodle soup).

 

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Guess what happened when I took them to the class?

making Korean handmade noodle soup1
rolling the dough

 

All stuck together!!! 🙁

making Korean handmade noodle soup2

 

We didn’t have any rolling pins so we were creative with our noodles and it was so much fun~

making Korean handmade noodle soup3

 

making Korean handmade noodle soup4

 

At the end of the class, we had delicious noodle soup and everyone was happy!! handmade Korean noodle soup1

 

handmade Korean noodle soup2

 

handmade Korean noodle soup4

Korean handmade noodle soup
boiling…. waiting…

 

Korean handmade noodle soup
Finally!

 

This is actually one of my favourite dish to eat in Korea. Check out my previous post on kalguksu

Happy cooking everyone!

 

Eating my way through Seoul II

Eating my way through Seoul II

If I have to pick one restaurant from my childhood memory in Korea, there is only one that pops up in my mind. Every time I visit Korea I always go.  The restaurant has been around since 1966 and it’s renowned for their handmade noodle soup (kal guk su-칼국수).  Why do I like this restaurant so much?  Firstly, there aren’t many non-chain restaurants that make their own noodles and their authentic stock like this one. Any guesses??  Drum roll please….. Myundong Gyoja (명동 교자) restaurant!

My last visit to Korea was going to be a slightly different to my usual trip. Instead of going to all my usual favourite places, I decided I was only  going to try new places,  but Myundong Gyoja had to be an exception. I just couldn’t go back home without having my fix from Myungdong Gyoja restaurant.

My girlfriend and I arrived at the restaurant exactly at noon and luckily there were only a few people waiting for a table. Usually, there is a long queue with a mix of locals and tourists.  By the time we finished our lunch, there were at least 50 people waiting outside for tables.  The staff  were very efficient and friendly despite the high turn over of the customers and all the food was served really fast. Don’t expect to sit and chit chat however. It’s one of those restaurants where you eat and run…

 

 

kal guk su(칼국수), aka handmade noodle soup is the star dish here. The free flow Kimchi is also very famous and has an incredible amount of  garlic.  It’s so strong they give you chewing gum when you ask for the bill to ease the smell of garlic. Besides the kimchi, a bowl of rice mixed with millets is served free of charge with  the noodle soup. It’s a lot of food for only S$10.

 

 

I was reading through a few reviews on the restaurant in Korean and one of the reviews suggested to order only one bowl of kal guk su and one serving of dumplings so you can have best of the both.  We were silly enough to order a bowl of noodle soup each and ended up staring at other customers with dumplings!!

 

 

 

Other dishes served in this restaurant include cold soy bean noodle (kong guk su) and chilli noodles (bibim guksu). I have never tried these dishes simply because the kal gul su is the best and leave no room for anything else. According to the restaurant website, you can  buy their home made kimchi and take it away.

 

How to get to Myung dong Gyoja:

 

Address:

Seoul-si Jung-gu Myeongdong 10-gil 29
(Myeongdong 2-ga)

There are two Myungdong Gyoja restaurants in Myungdong, They are not too far from each other.  If you are heading to Seoul next time, don’t forget to check this out!

Tour of Gwangjang market

Tour of Gwangjang market

My trip to Korea a few weeks ago was a little dampened by an unexpected typhoon and the early arrival of monsoon season. The weather was great on the first two days and then rained day and night from day three. At one stage, the rain and wind was so strong I didn’t think I was going to make it back to Singapore.

I usually go to Nam-de-mun market when I go to Korea but this trip I decided to visit somewhere less known(by tourists) called Gwangjang market. It’s located in between Jongno 3ga and jongno 5ga subway station. I didn’t realise how big this market was until I had a look at the map. It is more known to the locals as a wholesale shops and food.

Gwangjang market was opened in 1904. You can find many wholesale shops selling Korean traditional costumes (hanbok -한복) and fabrics. This is where I usually by my bath towels. Only ₩10,000(U$10) each and the quality is exceptional. I used to visit this market to either buy towels or have lunch so I never really took the opportunity to look around.

It also has an old fashion market selling fresh vegetables and seafood.

This is one of the most popular fish that Koreans use. You can’t find it in a western supermarket. It’s called hairtail or belt fish. We love to grill or steam them in chilli powder and soy sauce. I have seen this fish in the Malay market in Singapore a few times but it’s usually really hard to find.

This was the most interesting shop I found. This lady sells homemade soy sauce, chilli sauce and miso paste. It was pity that I couldn’t buy some. I am always given some by mum so It would have been an insult if I brought some home. Next time…

Besides the shopping, Gwangjang market is famous for muk ja golmok (street food-먹자골목). I had a little walk around the street and had lunch afterwards. It’s a little bit like being in a Singapore hawker centre but much bigger. There are lots of little stalls. Some stalls were still closed as some only cater for night crowds.

This stall sells chilli rice cake (dduk bok yi – 떡뽁이), japche, fishcake soup, pig trotters, gimbap. Pretty much everything!!

 

One of the most famous food in this market is mung bean pancake made the old fashion way. Mung beans are ground by the old stone mills.

 

 

 

The second most popular food in this market is handmade noodle soup. I really wanted to eat this soup as the weather was a bit grey but obviously everyone thought the same as it was a full house!

 

My lunch stop at the market!

 

We ordered so much food. As usual, my eyes were bigger than my stomach! The first dish is a very simple noodle called party noodle(janchi guksu-잔치국수).

 

Mini gimbap with soon de also known as Korean blood sausage. Some people just love this.

 

Next is one of my favourites to have in summer. You can see ice floating in the soup. It’s soybean soup with rice noodle. Very refreshing…

 

After all this food, I had to make a quick stop by a dessert place. This lady has been here with her mother making rice cake for the past 10 years. When I visited she was making rice cake which is made with glutinous rice powder and red bean. Her hands were so fast, I could barely see what she was doing.

If you are visiting Seoul, check this market out. I think it’s an authentic way to experience Korean food and cheap shopping!